Project Starline Video Chat Booths Will Soon Be Tested in the Real World

Project Starline Video Chat Booths Will Soon Be Tested in the Real World

Google's complex video chat booths will be more than simply a brilliant design exercise in the near future. According to Ars Technica, the business will begin deploying Project Starline prototypes in the offices of some of its corporate partners for "regular" testing later this year. In other words, Google will go beyond on-campus demonstrations to see how its "magic windows" operate.

Salesforce, T-Mobile, and WeWork are among the program's partners. Over 100 firms from healthcare, media, and retail participated in the in-house demos.

Project Starline is essentially an attempt to develop a natural-feeling telepresence system. Each participant sits in a booth with an array of cameras and infrared projectors that generate a realistic 3D image, as well as spatial audio capture that makes it appear as though the speech is originating from the digital persona's lips. When combined with head tracking and a 65-inch, 8K glasses-free display, the device creates the illusion that the other person is sitting directly in front of you. This should result in more effortless meetings than gazing at a computer monitor with a camera.

Of course, the issue is whether the early access program will result in installations in your workplace's boardroom or the local supermarket. While Google has not specified the price of a Project Starline booth, the technology is inherently pricey and takes up a lot of space. Smaller organizations may struggle to justify this when off-the-shelf machines may suffice. The timing is also not good. While remote and hybrid work have grown in popularity, Starline is on the rise as more people return to in-person engagement. The audience for the technology isn't nearly as vast as it may have been a year ago, and we don't expect it to grow any time soon.

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Paul Syverson
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Paul Syverson
Paul Syverson is the founder of Product Reviews. Paul is a computer scientist; he used to carry out a handful of significant studies which contributed to bringing in many special features on the site. He has a huge passion for computers and other tech products. He is always diligent in delivering quality writings to bring the most value to people. Syverson.org |

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